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230. Letters of Love

Harold J. Laski, the famous socialist professor of The London School of Economics wrote to his wife soon after his wedding twice a day. Love has an irresistible urge. It finds expression in writing. Passionate natures pour themselves into passionate words of Love. Napoleon from the battlefield wrote to Josephine and he excelled Laski. He would write thrice a day to his object of love. Often, Josephine would not even open the letters and amused herself with other men.

A girl who received letters of love from her love ended up marrying the postman who brought those letters to her. In her scheme of things, the contents of the letters were connected with their deliverer. She must, of course, be deeply in love!  Obviously, passion is NOT love. It is the energy of the vital nature which is passionate. The lady who happily transferred her lover's emotions to the postman is a rare phenomenon whom no one desires to emulate. Her love, if it can be called love, is skin deep.

If passion is not love, if youthful ardour is not love, what else is it? Of course, when one is in love, he flatters himself that his love is Spirit calling to Spirit. Everyone says that to himself when he is infatuated. Obviously, infatuation too is not love. Is there a characteristic or several characteristics of what we conceive as Love? Love is undying. If one's love dies, he quickly disqualifies himself. That which dies sooner or later is NOT love. He who finds his love surviving marriage can describe the emotion he felt as love. It has one more characteristic. It does not depend upon the other receiving it. Love is Love whether it is received or not. It is undying too. Before enumerating the rest of its characteristics, I shall add, in the context of the enterprising lady who ended up with the postman, that it is not transferable!



Para 1, Line 1, Economic -

Para 1, Line 1, Economic - Economics











story | by Dr. Radut